Watch This Desperate Dolphin Approach A Nearby Diver And “Ask” For Help

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300,000 dolphins die every year after becoming entangled in fishing nets and other pollution.

While diving with manta rays in Garden Eel Cove off the coast of Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, co-founder and vice president of Manta Pacific Research Foundation Keller Laros encountered a troubled bottlenose dolphin — somehow the poor cetacean got its left pectoral fin snagged by a fishing hook.

Dolphins are incredibly intelligent creatures; and much like humans, dolphins are very aware when they are in danger and to ask for help when needed. In this particular situation, the injured dolphin seeks help from Keller Laros. As Laros gets to work, the dolphin calmly allows the diver to remove the fishing hook from its fin.

Screen Shot: YouTube/Keller Laros


The patient dolphin swims around Laros as he attempts to remove the hook and fishing line. After several attempts with just his hands, he removes a pair of scissors from his vest and uses them to cut the line. The dolphin is finally free and calmly swims away.

Screen Shot: YouTube/Keller Laros

To all the fishers out there, please be mindful of fishing waste. Fishing hooks and nets are a big threat to all of the creatures in the sea. As for Laros, thank you for helping this beautiful dolphin!

Screen Shot: YouTube/Keller Laros

Check out the video below to see Laros work his magic and free this dolphin!

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Mitchell Canh is a West Michigan resident and enjoys exploring the great outdoors. He lives by the Vietnamese proverb and his family's motto: "The good leaves protect the worn-out leaves." He hopes to protect the Earth and its inhabitants from climate change and pollution.
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